• CNST PoliMi Milano © 2016 IIT 4679
  • CNST PoliMi Milano © 2016 IIT 4677
  • CNST PoliMi Milano © 2016 IIT 4682
  • CNST PoliMi Milano © 2016 IIT 4681

The Center for Nano Science and Technology (CNST) is one node of the network established by the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia with Italian academies in order to foster synergy in the national research. The mission of the center is "innovation", therefore the goal of the CNST scientific team is to transfer new basic knowledge into new applications.

CNST has a focus on material science, and it is able to conduct the complete production line, from conceiving and realizing a new material to its application in devices (solar cells, transistor and LEDs), through a comprehensive characterization. The areas of competence are Material Chemistry, Molecular Electronics, Printed Electronics, Nanotechnology Fabrication and Optical-Photophysical-Morphological and Theoretical Characterization.

Research Lines

Founded in 2010, the Printed and Molecular Electronics (PME) group works in the Center for Nano Science and Technology @PoliMi (CNST) of the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia. PME aims at improving the knowledge on the opto-electronic properties of solution-processable semiconductors, in particular conjugated organic materials, and at taking full advantage of their printability in order to deliver applications in the large-area and flexible electronics fields.

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The mission of Nanomaterials for Energy and Life Science research line is "innovation", therefore the goal of the our scientific team is to transfer new basic knowledge into new applications.

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The Advanced Materials for Optoelettronics (AMO) focus on the investigation of the physics behind low cost "future generation" photovoltaic concepts and on the development of associated optoelectronic devices, with a special emphasis on the role of interfacial optoelectronic mechanisms with the goal of improving device efficiency and stability.

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The importance of vision for robots is pervasive: from self-driving cars to detecting and handling objects for service robots in homes, from kitting in industrial workshops, to robots filling shelves and shopping baskets in supermarkets, etc. All these applications, and many more, imply interacting with a wide variety of objects, requiring in turn a deep understanding of what these objects look like, their properties, functionalities and likely locations.

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